Posts Tagged ‘color’

Feel the Mood

Posted: September 24, 2012 in Blog
Tags: , , , ,

I’m moving to my new website: www.worldbyjan.com

Every photo you can see on the Internet consist of two parts. Technical and emotional. I know guys that look just for technique, using rule of thirds, put the subject directly into intersection and they are done. I’m more that emotional guy. I want to have some mood in my photos, want them to talk to you, to viewer. What were my feelings, what I saw, what my heart saw.

Don’t get me wrong, composition is important, but when I see a photo with huge emotional charge, I just don’t care about the golden rule or anything like it. If a photo stops me, talks to me, grabs my attention, it has a big chance to be a great photo. Try to tell a story with your pictures. Putting something into a frame is nice, but does it really belong there? What is a purpose of that subject? Does it bring something to a image you’re trying to take or does it take it out? Think about this next time you’re shooting. 😉

Technical Stuff:
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Lens: Canon EF 28-70mm f/3.5-4.5 @28mm
Aperture: f/8
Shutter Speed: 0,3s
ISO: 100
WB: Temp 4650/Tint +1
Processing: Lightroom, Photoshop, Nik HDR Efex Pro

Advertisements

Moody Images

Posted: June 16, 2012 in Blog
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

You can take a look at a picture and fall in love with it without any special reason. After a while you’ll start thinking what made me fall in love with it? There isn’t anything extra special so is it’s composition? Subject? Anything else? Sometimes it is a mood in the image. You can feel it but it is hard to describe. Of course it isn’t always there but you can create it using light or even post processing. But believe me, not every time it works perfectly.

Try Using Different Subjects

Posted: December 5, 2011 in Blog
Tags: , , ,

A lot of people out there think/are stuck with an idea that your subject has to be some thing. But that’s not true, subjects can be different. Not just some person, building, landscape, mug but think about something else. Why not color? Contrast? Emotions? Something else!

Just take this image as an example. Most colors in scene are greyish and then I saw this blue boat. Not the best image I can produce, but it makes my point 😉

 

The Infinite Road Uncorrected

Hi to all. During my exam period at the university I didn’t pass throught one exam and I’m waiting for second term. This term is planned on February 1st and my last exam was taken on January 17th. So this whole time I’m at home having nothing to do, because most of my friends are in Prague or spread around whole republic and, Slovakia, Russia, USA, UK, Austria, Australia and more countries around the world. So the only way how to keep in touch with them is using Social Network. Also because the bad weather I didn’t go out and make some pictures but today everything changed! 🙂

HDR from the Walk, Unprocessed

The temperature was quite good, about 0°C (32°F), no rain, no snow but just the sky wasn’t anything interesting. To be honest the sky was just one huge plane of grey color mixed sometimes with darker and lighter grey. And I wanted to go out in these conditions and shoot landscapes? Yes, not nature but landscapes!? I really had to be crazy ….

But really, the tip for today, and not just for today is simple. If the sky doesn’t look good, don’t put it into the scene. It is simple and effective. At least you won’t have that boring plane of grey color on the top of your images. Also sometimes this can help and you can use it to your advantage. With this plane made by clouds you get a free extra super large softbox and that is cool for portraits. This can be the plan B when weather isn’t so great outside.

In the begining of the post I put two images, both weren’t finished. The Infinite Road isn’t bad at all, but the white balance is absolutely somewhere else than it should be and with the HDR you can see a really bad blue tint. Here are the final images. For the road I used only Lightroom 3 to process it, for the HDR I had to jump into Photoshop, set black, white and grey point using curves and than I used a plug-in. The secret ingredience … Nik Software Color Efex and it’s Brillance/Warmth preset. Hope you’ll enjoy them.

The Infinite Road Processed

HDR from the Walk Processed

I think this name is quite good for things I’d like to tell you about. HRD stands for High Dynamic Range and there is a huge boom with HDR photographers. The basic idea of this type of photography is to mix multiple exposures and increase a dynamic range. You can do it using several methods, the most complicated is using Photoshop and masks to blend your exposures together. Thanks God, there are few good pieces of software that will do it for you.

The most know is probably Photomatix by HDRSoft. Another cool tool is Photoshop, but version CS5. This exact version has HDR Pro feature that will merge your exposures and do it the cool way 😉 But this article isn’t about using different programs to do this type of photography. It is about something different.

A lot of folks out there think HDR is cool, some are neutral and the rest hate it. That is OK, but many photographers that like HDR images get pissed off when they take their HDR images and then they will start to hate it. How may it happen? Simple, all this softwares like Photomatix or even HDR Pro are made “just” for merging down your exposures, it won’t make the final image on its own. But a lot of people don’t know that and that might be one of the problems they thinkHDR sucks.

So how do you get those cool looking images like Trey Ratcliff makes? When you merge your exposures, save the file as a 16bit TIFF file. Then go into Photoshop or any other program you are using for editing and finish it there. With HDR photography a huge problem is halo (those shiny aura looking area around some part of image) and bad color. On the image bellow you can see how it looks and get familiar with it.

 

HDR Image w/o color and halo correction

When you click on the image next to this text you can see all the issues. Yellows are too much yellow and around the tree is a big halo. Halos happen in parts of image where there are big contrast differences like in this part. Tree branches are dark color, about dark brown and the sky is nice light blue tint.

And that color issues? Well lets think about it first. Lets say you are taking some images of landscapes and your exposure setting is absolutely correct. What will happen? You will have good exposure on the landscape but colors might not be so good and to be honest I’m almost sure you’ll try to fix it. When you’ll underexpose the scene, colors there will get more vibrant and saturated. That is good point and one of the reasons why Moose Peterson, famous landscape and wildlife photographer, shoots almost all the time at -0.5 EV from correct exposure. For the colors.

Now when you have some scene with a lot of dark spots, your colors will be more saturated there and even more when you will use some HDR program to process it. That is what happend with the bottom part of the tree and houses in the background.

Now how to get rid of this stuff? Simple, hop into Photoshop, because that is the best way, at least for me, how to do it. For getting rid of that bad color I try to get my white point, black point and grey point set correctly. Another way how you can do it is using Hue/Saturation adjustment layer and affecting only colors you want to affect. After it use layer mask to blend it with your picture. It may require more than one Hue/Saturation layer and don’t be afraid to experiment. The last but not least option is to use one of the original images and layer masks to blend it with the HDR processed image. To be honest, I don’t use this last method.

About halos …. well that is more simple than you think. You can use clone tool with blend mode set to normal. Then clone the pieces further away from the tree over the ones that are closer and lighter. Another way is to set your clone tool blend mode to darken. This will affect only pixels that are brighter than the clone source and clone just those. The problem here is that it is still cloning. You take one part of image and insert it severaltimes into different locations. The default texture might go away. I personally like to use burn and dodge tools for this. It is simple and fast. Problem here is a bit with control because the changes are made on the actual layer and with using clone tool you can make changes on blank layer above. That way bad cloning won’t affect the original layer you are cloning from.

There are of course other ways how you can do this but this is the way I do it 😉 Here is the final image.

HDR w/ corrections

Hi guys, today was really perfect day for photography, especially landscape & nature using CPL. Because winter is coming, the sun isn’t as high as it is in summer. I used this as a weapon and went shooting at 3 PM.

Matt Kloskowski said that you should turn your CPL to the maximal effect and than move it about 50 % or 60 %. If you don’t do it, it might look fake. Well, I didn’t do it and it was a huge mistake! I had to increase the luminance of blues and aquas to get better sky.

Here you can see what CPL turned on maximum does. You can compensate for it but the sky is one of the reasons why you are doing this. You have to choose, what you’ll do when using this filter.

Here are the rest of shots from that day, I hope it’ll be better allied than my previous posts.